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CBSRMT Episode Information
Title:
And Nothing but the Truth
Plot:
A young investigator guesses at the facts of a hit-and-run case and believes the convict to be a willing victim in lieu of his son. But he cannot prove it to his superior.
Episode:
0018
Air Dates:
First Run - January 23, 1974
Repeat - March 17, 1974
Repeat - December 31, 1978
Writer:
Listen:
Rating:
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14 Responses to Episode 0018


Great episode. A morality play with an excellent twist ending, properly foreshadowed. I will say this about the morality play, however. Although it seems like sound moral advice to "be a man" and to "take your medicine," any defense attorney will tell you that you're nuts if you take that attitude with the legal system. The prisons are filled with people serving large sentences for minor crimes because they wanted to "do the right thing." It was dark; it was rainy; he didn't see the old man; he just thinks he hit "something." How many other cars were on the road? Was it the accident that killed him, or was it alcohol poisoning? Why sign a confession if you're not even sure what happened! Morality/crime drama; no supernatural elements.

My first impression of the wife in this story was that she was an annoying, whiny, goody two-shoes who is semi-reclusive and seems to spend an awful time sleeping; conversely, it seemed like the father was a fantastic guy who was willing to take the fall for his son to save the young man's bright future from a drunken hit-and-run charge. The fabulous twist comes when we discover that this is a one-sided "criss-cross" type of situation, with pops gladly taking the fall for his son so that he gets with an alibi for his own--much more serious--crime. Some remarkable anachronisms in this story, such as "acid rock . . . loud enough to blow your mind" getting a legal abortion, and words like "dig his scene" juxtaposed with a hard-boiled "film-noirish" detective and mention of cops walking the beat.

One of the greatest RMT episodes! The first several minutes of the story don't really elude to the great plot and intriguing twists it contains, which makes for fun listening and a really enjoyable episode.

I knew I recognized this from somewhere... This episode is not an original... It's a remake of an episode of Theater 5 that originally aired on 06/04/65 named "Untrue Confessions" (episode 220). That episode was also written by Ian Martin. This appears to expand the 20 minute Theater 5 episode.. Still great, though!

One of the few stories I've heard with a younger sounding actor. An interesting story where a father demonstrates an act of kindness but no one believes the act is selfless. We learn why when we are told the complete truth. I wonder what would have been the conclusion if DNA evidence were available in 1974.

Evil incarnate disguised behind a good deed. The revelation is satisfying and spooky.

Good story. Listened to this while driving through a rainy Mississippi morning. And nice original story note, reyx77!

A college professor tries to take the blame for his wayward son who has hit and killed a pedestrian. A young detective suspects the truth, but can't convince his boss of it.

A college professor tries to take the blame for his wayward son who has hit and killed a pedestrian. A young detective suspects the truth, but can't convince his boss of it. Rich characters and solid acting support this solid morality tale.

A young man hits a vagrant with his car and flees the scene. His father, a college professor and womanizer, offers to take the rap so his son's reputation and future academic career will not be in jeopardy. His sick mother, on the other hand, is less enthusiastic and feels her son should own up to his responsibilities. The detectives on the case clash in their approach: old-world what-you-see-is-what-you-get, versus the new-world psychoanalysis-dig-deep-for-the-truth. A good crime mystery with a well developed story and a solid ending.

This was a very well done episode. A strong morality play. A very well constructed script by the aforementioned Martin. Arnold Moss turns in another powerful performance. I also enjoyed immensely the interplay between-- the world-weary Ralph Bell and the gung-ho William Redfield--cops. They really helped carry the story. This had a good twist ending to it. Arnold Moss seems noble, almost heroic in the beginning and then we learn his true motivations. Great selection! Until next time.............

Yes. I selected this one specifically because of your recent discussion about him and all the comments on the previous weeks show. This is the second Martin play presented in the RMT series. When I listened to this one I thought it was very well done and had a good moral point. I guess we could call this a Mini-Martin-Marathon!

A good morality play where, even at the beginning, you see the morality of the son even if he's unsure of himself and is manipulated by his father (who sounds like he wasn't that interested in his son to begin with). It could be an example of nature vs. nurture.

It was interesting to hear Himan Brown at the beginning when he discussed the "Great Killers of History" such as Roman Emperor Nero, Attila the Hun, Bluebeard, artillery fire, the Atom Bomb, and finally the Automobile; which is a big part in this CBSRMT episode. Himan Brown is a good host, but his tone of voice would've been suitable for episodes like #0529, #0644, #0863, and #0866 because those are farces. Kristopher Tabori (as David Williams), Arnold Moss (as Grant Williams), Clarissa Blackburn (as Marian Williams), Ralph Bell (as Lieutenant Klamath), and William Redfield (as Detective Rizzo) are talented actors, but their characters weren't likable enough. There was no compassion in the Williams Family; especially at the 31-minute 22-second mark where Grant says to his son David, "I will kill you if you let me down." If the father was going to take the blame for his son's crime, who would pay for the son's tuition? At first, I thought the father was going to take the blame because it was an opportunity for him to get away from his wife who was bitter, jealous, and mentally ill. But the twisted answer is at the 25-minute 52-second mark (SPOILER ALERT). And as for the music, it felt dramatic at the 14-minute 4-second mark, then it was chilling at the 25-minute 13 second mark, then mysterious at the 26-minute mark, and then intense at the 30-minute 8-second mark, but it stopped right there. No more mysterious tunes after that. Ian Martin wrote a likable drama-mystery, but not enough suspense that would keep you on the edge of your seat. It's still worth listening to

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