Agnes Moorehead (Actor)

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(06-13-1900 - 04-30-1974) Age 74

Agnes Moorehead was a regular player with Orson Welles Mercury Playhouse. She appeared in 70 films beginning with Citizen Kane.  Modern audiences remember her as Endora, the mother-in-law in the series Bewitched.  Agnes Moorehead has had an extensive radio career during the golden age of radio.

She appeared in the following 2 episodes of Radio Mystery Theater
Date Episode Title Plot
01/06/1974 0001 The Old Ones Are Hard to Kill

An old lady rents a room to a sick boarder. She runs into problems with his strange deathbed confession.

01/26/1974 0021 The Ring of Truth A tortured story about a father's coercion to get his daughter to testify against her beloved in a homicide by vehicle case.


20 Responses to Moorehead Agnes

Agnes Moorehead was a great actress and I enjoyed her two appearances on CBSRMT and around the same time seeing her on reruns of Bewitched too.

John

Agnes Moorehead was a great choice for the very first CBSRMT episode. Her acting in both episodes is extremely good.

James King

Agnes Moorehead was in the very first episode of CBSRMT. She also had a long history in radio - The Shadow, Mercury Theater, Cavalcade of America, Suspense, and an episode of Mystery in the Air with Peter Lorre - I'm sure there are probably more shows that she appeared on. She was only on 2 episodes of CBSRMT. She passed away in 1974, so the two episodes were probably the last things she did.

Jamie

Her biography, I Love the Illusion, is available.

Diane Flannagan

She shares my birthday. I didn't know she was in one besides the first. I will have to go back and hear them again

Angela

Agnes Moorhead was awesome in Sorry Wrong Number. She kept the suspense up. I liked her in The Ring of Truth. After that she annoyed me as well.

Robert

re: Agnes Moorehead . . I'd just as soon forget "Endora" - When I was a little kid watching "Bewitched' I just couldn't STAND her! HOWEVER, she IS the "!st Lady of Suspense" and a great voice actor(ress) OPEN QUESTION: Does anyone know why E.G. Marshall left CBSRMT? Like many, I feel Tammy Grimes just didn't work, and, was the show cancelled BECAUSE of her?

Charlie

I liked her in both episodes. Believable and versatile. These shows were the last things she did. The second one of them was aired posthumously. What an enormous talent we lost.

Greg

Such an interesting face.

Senmut

She rocked in the Twilight Zone classic "The Invaders." From what I recall, she played a terrified mute woman never uttering a word. A powerful performance to be sure.

beenolas

I knew this one one of my favorites but didn't realize She was on any of the CBSRMT episodes. Now it makes sense. I brilliant actress and according to her peers, a lovely person according to Erin Murphy (Tabitha).

Kurt

Agnes Robertson Moorehead (December 6, 1900 – April 30, 1974) was an American actress whose six-decade career included work in radio, stage, film, and television. To current audiences, she is best known for her role as Endora on the television series Bewitched, but she also has notable roles in films, including Citizen Kane, The Magnificent Ambersons, All That Heaven Allows, Show Boat, and Hush… Hush, Sweet Charlotte. In 1937, Moorehead had joined Orson Welles' Mercury Players, as one of his principal performer.he performed in his The Mercury Theatre on the Air radio adaptations, and had a regular role opposite Welles in the serial The Shadow as Margo Lane. Moorehead made her film debut as the mother of his own character, Charles Foster Kane, in Citizen Kane (1941), considered by most film critics as one of the best films ever made. Moorehead was featured in Welles's second film, The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), and received the New York Film Critics Award and an Academy Award nomination for her performance. She also appeared in Journey Into Fear (1943), a Mercury film production. By the mid-1940s, Moorehead became a Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer contract player, negotiating a $6,000-a-week contract with the provision to perform also on radio, an unusual clause at the time. Moorehead explained that MGM usually refused to allow their actors to play on radio as "the actors didn't have the knowledge or the taste or the judgment to appear on the right sort of show. Throughout her career, Moorehead skillfully portrayed puritanical matrons, neurotic spinsters, possessive mothers, and comical secretaries. She played Parthy Hawks, wife of Cap'n Andy and mother of Magnolia, in MGM's hit 1951 remake of Show Boat. She also was in Dark Passage and Since You Went Away. Moorehead was in Broadway productions of Don Juan in Hell in 1951–1952, and Lord Pengo in 1962–1963. In the 1950s, Moorehead continued to work in films and appeared on stage across the country. Her roles included a national tour of Shaw's Don Juan in Hell. She appeared as the hypochondriac Mrs. Snow in Disney's hit film Pollyanna. On her first radio role, Moorehead appeared as a replacement for Dorothy Denvir's role as Min Gump in The Gumps. During the 1940s and 1950s, Moorehead was one of the most in-demand actresses for radio dramas, especially on the CBS show Suspense. During the 946-episode-run of Suspense, Moorehead was cast in more episodes than any other actor or actress. She was often introduced on the show as the "first lady of Suspense". Moorehead's most successful appearance on Suspense was in the play Sorry, Wrong Number,(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1r5GZral6zs) written by Lucille Fletcher, Moorehead played one of her last roles on January 6, 1974, as Mrs. Ada Canby in the ironically titled "The Old Ones Are Hard to Kill" the inaugural episode of CBS Radio Mystery Theater. On the small screen -Moorehead guest starred on many series, including The Rebel and Alcoa Theatre(1959),Her role in the radio play Sorry, Wrong Number inspired writers of the CBS television series The Twilight Zone to script an episode with Moorehead in mind In "The Invaders Moorehead also had guest roles on Channing, Custer, Rawhide in "Incident at Poco Tiempo" as Sister Frances, and The Rifleman. On February 10, 1967, she portrayed Miss Emma Valentine in "The Night of the Vicious Valentine" on The Wild Wild West, a performance for which she won a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series. In 1970, Moorehead appeared as a dying woman who haunts her own house in the early Night Gallery episode "Certain Shadows on the Wall". She also reprised her role in Don Juan in Hell on Broadway and on tour, with an all-star cast that featured Edward Mulhare, Ricardo Montalban, and Paul Henreid. Moorehead also memorably supplied the voice of the friendly Mother Goose in Hanna-Barbera's 1973 adaptation of E. B. White's children's book Charlotte's Web.

Victor

I have the best memories as a teen of laying in bed with my transistor radio listening to RMT!

Dallas

WHAM Rochester NY 70's at 10:07 p.m :-) the creaky door would open slowly...... Had an old clock radio with a 60 minute sleep switch. My parents must have loved it because teenage me was home and in bed every weeknight by 10 to listen

Miles

i listened to this show, late at night when i lived in Tupelo, Oklahoma. the town just BARELY exists, anymore. The signal used to fade and i would practically go nuts waiting for it to return. Sometimes, i would miss a significant proportion of the programming, but i never gave up until i heard EG Marshall say, "Good Night and Pleasent Dreams" to the accompaniment of a haunted house door squealing shut just before that final bass drum beat.

Michael

Well since Albany and Rochester spoke up I will have to throw Syracuse in and I think it was WHEN. WHEN in Syracuse. I grew up in North Syracuse and went to Liverpool High School. It took me a little over 2 years to listen to all 1399 episodes. Yard work, hiking, gym time, etc were all opportunities to get 1 - 2 episodes per day in.

Philip

So do I, but it was not a transistor. It was a clock radio. I am not fabricating, but the clock radio I had at the time was the same make and model that they had on their refrigerator on Good Times.

Robert

Agnes Robertson Moorehead (December 6, 1900 – April 30, 1974) was an American actress whose six-decade career included work in radio, stage, film, and television. To current audiences, she is best known for her role as Endora on the television series Bewitched, but she also has notable roles in films, including Citizen Kane, The Magnificent Ambersons, All That Heaven Allows, Show Boat, and Hush… Hush, Sweet Charlotte. In 1937, Moorehead had joined Orson Welles' Mercury Players, as one of his principal performer.he performed in his The Mercury Theatre on the Air radio adaptations, and had a regular role opposite Welles in the serial The Shadow as Margo Lane. Moorehead made her film debut as the mother of his own character, Charles Foster Kane, in Citizen Kane (1941), considered by most film critics as one of the best films ever made. Moorehead was featured in Welles's second film, The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), and received the New York Film Critics Award and an Academy Award nomination for her performance. She also appeared in Journey Into Fear (1943), a Mercury film production. By the mid-1940s, Moorehead became a Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer contract player, negotiating a $6,000-a-week contract with the provision to perform also on radio, an unusual clause at the time. Moorehead explained that MGM usually refused to allow their actors to play on radio as "the actors didn't have the knowledge or the taste or the judgment to appear on the right sort of show. Throughout her career, Moorehead skillfully portrayed puritanical matrons, neurotic spinsters, possessive mothers, and comical secretaries. She played Parthy Hawks, wife of Cap'n Andy and mother of Magnolia, in MGM's hit 1951 remake of Show Boat. She also was in Dark Passage and Since You Went Away. Moorehead was in Broadway productions of Don Juan in Hell in 1951–1952, and Lord Pengo in 1962–1963. In the 1950s, Moorehead continued to work in films and appeared on stage across the country. Her roles included a national tour of Shaw's Don Juan in Hell. She appeared as the hypochondriac Mrs. Snow in Disney's hit film Pollyanna. On her first radio role, Moorehead appeared as a replacement for Dorothy Denvir's role as Min Gump in The Gumps. During the 1940s and 1950s, Moorehead was one of the most in-demand actresses for radio dramas, especially on the CBS show Suspense. During the 946-episode-run of Suspense, Moorehead was cast in more episodes than any other actor or actress. She was often introduced on the show as the "first lady of Suspense". Moorehead's most successful appearance on Suspense was in the play Sorry, Wrong Number,(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1r5GZral6zs) written by Lucille Fletcher, Moorehead played one of her last roles on January 6, 1974, as Mrs. Ada Canby in the ironically titled "The Old Ones Are Hard to Kill" the inaugural episode of CBS Radio Mystery Theater. On the small screen -Moorehead guest starred on many series, including The Rebel and Alcoa Theatre(1959),Her role in the radio play Sorry, Wrong Number inspired writers of the CBS television series The Twilight Zone to script an episode with Moorehead in mind In "The Invaders Moorehead also had guest roles on Channing, Custer, Rawhide in "Incident at Poco Tiempo" as Sister Frances, and The Rifleman. On February 10, 1967, she portrayed Miss Emma Valentine in "The Night of the Vicious Valentine" on The Wild Wild West, a performance for which she won a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series. In 1970, Moorehead appeared as a dying woman who haunts her own house in the early Night Gallery episode "Certain Shadows on the Wall". She also reprised her role in Don Juan in Hell on Broadway and on tour, with an all-star cast that featured Edward Mulhare, Ricardo Montalban, and Paul Henreid. Moorehead also memorably supplied the voice of the friendly Mother Goose in Hanna-Barbera's 1973 adaptation of E. B. White's children's book Charlotte's Web.

Adam

Hope this isn’t too provocative but I wonder if her voice might have been a little too big for radio? I mean, I love her in film and TV but she was so over the top on the radio that all I could hear was her.

Adam

the blasphemy!!! Aggie was the queen of radio..NO ONE compares! However, thank the Lord we got to have radio, movies, tv and stage to enjoy her talent..in my humble opinion, she is the queen of all vintage media!!

Adam


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