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CBSRMT Episode Information
Title:
The Hand
('Guy de Maupassant classic')
Plot:
A postal surprise in the form of a human hand leaves a man convinced of its apocalyptic portents.
Episode:
0080
Air Dates:
First Run - April 24, 1974
Repeat - July 14, 1974
Repeat - January 11, 1978
Repeat - July 28, 1979
Writer:
Listen:
Rating:
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51 Responses to Episode 0080


A very creepy story, that actually reminded me a little of the Biblical twins Jacob and Esau that fought in the womb. Suspense, reanimated body parts.

“I won't easily close my eyes tonight, for fear that my mind's eye will conjure up a vision of the black and desiccated hand with the yellow nails scrabbling like some loathsome crab across the floor, up and over my bed, and scuttling around the walls, it's four good fingers moving like spider legs, the mutilated stump of the fifth like a head...” Marshall's epilogue from episode 0080, The Hand.

Andy, what's cool is, I think Ian Martin (who not only acted in but WROTE some great RMT plays) used two OTHER brothers from history as his partial inspiration for this. Note the names "Richard Rowell" and "Sir John Rowell", as in "King Richard" (away fighting battles) and "Prince John" (messing up the kingdom while his big and better brother was away) from the Robin Hood legends!

A romance of horror and characterization. Magnificent!

A Frenchman un-intentionally assists an Englishman's wife in carrying out her husband's certain demise. The Englishman is a big game hunter who has a twin brother on the other side of the world (the USA). The twin who lives in the USA hates his brother because his brother inherited everything from his parents because he was born an hour ahead of him. At any rate, the Englishman's wife makes a simple request to the Frenchman (simply mail a letter). Unbeknownst to the Frenchman, this would help the twin in the USA pinpoint his brother's location, thus allowing him to deliver the dreadful "hand". This hand is just what it is, a hand, chopped of at the middle of the forearm and is dead, yet alive, and on a mission, to kill. Despite the Englishman's attempt to contain the hand (chains), the hand still manages to free itself...Will this hand succeed in killing the Englishman?

A Corsican doctor befriends an enigmatic English adventurer who has taken up residence on the island. The Britisher receives the bizarre gift of a severed hand and soon becomes convinced of his own impeding death, despite being as robust as a bull.

RMT listeners, It's a very interesting in that the late RMT playwright (and author of some of the best ones, IMO) / actor Ian Martin took the original Guy de Maupassant short story and infused it with two key elements of the tale of Robin Hood...not men in tights robbing from a corrupt government to give to the poor, but rather with the subplot within that story of the head of said government Prince John vs. his absent brother King Richard the Lion-hearted, who was trying to return to England from a war (vs. Salahdin the great(?), a middle eastern, muslim king). Obviously, brothers King Richard and Prince John aren't in this tale, but Sir John Rowell and (apparently) his twin brother Richard are. The music is great - the recurring, haunting, unnerving 8-note background music at the 5:00 minute mark is perfectly placed throughout the show, with my favorite RMT music closer at the end of the 3rd act. Enjoy...

Yes, this is an enthralling episode. Once begun, it's hard to stop listening. Indeed, I brought up the original short story on the Internet afterwards and glanced through it, and it felt to me like a synopsis of the radio script. Thumbs up (if you'll pardon the expression) for a fine adaptation indeed. And doesn't E.G. Marshall relish his signing-off piece for this story!

This is definately one of the best ever! Alexander Scourby and Guy Sorel turn in first-rate performances! The interplay between these two characters makes this episode a cut above the rest. So, does the nightmarish image of dozens of crawling hands in Donnet's dreams. The third act exemplifies why radio drama should be experienced in total darkness! The music is stupendous in this broadcast! The right music just carries a scene and invokes the right atmosphere-- and Himan Brown seems to always know what to use and when. 

Yes, nice one! Been a favorite of mine for quite some time. Don't invite people into your house that you meet accidentally while hunting, unless you don't mind having them post secret letters for your deranged spouse. My gigantic brother once sent me one of his severed hands . . . it was either the right one or else the left one I'm sure . . . and I tossed it deftly into the vat of hyrochloric acid that I keep by the front door. No problems; I'm still here. So you all might consider getting some of this stuff, before the postman comes around again.

In fact, here's the original story by de Maupassant. I was thinking this might be a fun one to ask: "Which is more fun to hear...the adaptation or the original?" I don't want to put down the latter, but I do think the RMT had some occasionally good adaptations. One thing about Martin's version...in retrospect, he gives us a big clue at the beginning to how all this could have happened. I, too, loved the music. This was one of the scariest RMTs I can remember from my original listening days, and hearing it again, it's that "do-re-mi-fa-so-la-so-fa" in minor chords (done in three separate versions...one a simple one with (I think) some kind of mallet instrument and a harp(?) right after Alexander Scourby's character says he'll have to satisfy his curiosity about Sir John Rowell, one using violins when Sir John is bringing his "gift from America" in to unwrap it, and the full instrumentation one with low piano notes at the beginning, played both when Sir John is facing off with Scourby like a gunslinger, and also when Sir John's prediction has come true). Call me a wimp, but that music gave me chills in my younger days. This was one of both Scourby's and Guy "Sir John" Sorrells best roles on the RMT, IMHO.

I agree about RMT's adaptations. In fact---not to get off the subject---but I would even go so far as to say that they were more than occasionally excellent, especially in the case of the many Guy de Maupassant stories they adapted. Their version of "Diary of a Madman" was horribly spine-chilling, suspenseful and, at the very end, extremely satisfying as well. They took the one or two page original by de Maupassant, which is chillingly effective but very simple, and expanded it into something really amazing. (Can't recall who did the adaptation on that one.) I think the RMT version of Poe's "Tell-Tale Heart" also expands upon the original quite effectively, not to mention that it provides Robert Dryden with perhaps his most wonderfully disgusting lecherous-old-man role. (Then there's Fred Gwynne who, as usual, is just incomparable.) But, back to "The Hand"----I'm very curious to find out where in the story Martin foreshadows an explanation to the crime. I've actually heard the episode twice pretty recently, but I just can't remember where it would be. Could you possibly send a private message to clue me in? (I wouldn't want to spoil it for those who haven't listened yet.) Thanks!

But, back to "The Hand"----I'm very curious to find out where in the story Martin foreshadows an explanation to the crime. "GOT him - right under the englishman's nose!"

I liked this one. It had me worried that the wife was imprisoned against her will and the husband was going to kill the cop if he found out that he had that letter. Then he ended up finding out when "the hand" showed up in the mail. What a description they gave of that hand. Eeeeuuuuwwww! I was wondering how it fled the scene and then to hear the cop found it on the dead man's grave, I figured it was going to go on a killing spree or something. Of course, by that time the hour was up and we're left guessing as to what became of the hand. Maybe it turned over a new leaf and went straight.

Ok, I finally listened to the program for this week and I have to say I thoroughly enjoyed it. Though I've never read the original story, I think Ian Martin did a great job of painting a terrific picture for the imagination. The description of the hand was excellent and other details (such as the description of the trophy room) were so vivid they were made believable. I'll bet a few people think story was hokie but I imagine I would have been terrorized had I heard this play as a kid. As an adult, I could appreciate the fine production so I rated this program as a 5/5, though I rounded up from a 9/10. Great pick!

Great to see you posted a link to the original story. I'll be reading it directly. I agree with the comments regarding the music as it was chilling in it's effectiveness. Again, this show would have scared the crap out of me as a kid and this is one measure I use to judge a program.

What a great story! I did not get to it until the end of this week. It was worth the wait. Thanks! Pardon the pun in the subject line. I couldn't resist.

If anyone complains about the pun it's because they didn't think of it!

this episode has just made it to my top 5 list. i really enjoyed this one. i read the origonal story but i must say i like the rmt show better. i usually like to read a story more than listen to or watch an adaptation. i like the part about the wife. not knowing if she was being held as a prisoner. who do you believe? the man or the wife? the discription of the hand , very gripping.

I listened to and rated this one some time ago. I called it a "Kafkaesque tale of lost love and redemption." While the main character is not as tragic as Kafka's hero in "Metamorphisis", he is similar. This is perhaps the best work I've heard by Elspeth Eric. My opinion of her does not need to be aired again. Suffice it to say I always listen to her work waiting to be disappointed -- or occasionally disgusted. I truly enjoyed this one and was pleasantly surprised.

To date my all time favorite for CBSRMT and OTR in general. A feast of auditory delight.

I really enjoyed this episode. It had interesting characters and an eerie, intriguing plot. The acting and production values were top-notch. Also, I noticed that the music was especially good. There seemed to be some new music written for this one, in addition to the usual incidental themes, which really enhanced the dark sense of foreboding. It is also an excellent dramatization. Guy de Maupassant's original story is engaging, but extremely short---barely 8 pages long. Presented as a brief unsettling anecdote, the tale is told by the magistrate to a group of ladies at a party in Paris. In the original story there is no insane wife and no betrayal by the magistrate with regard to sending the letter to America---in fact, his friendship with Sir Rowell is not nearly as close. Their acquaintance is only casual. Also, the hand is already there chained to the wall. The next thing our narrator hears, Rowell is dead, and he must go to investigate the grisly murder. The original story is effective because it is so short, giving very little foreshadowing, so the final outcome with the hand is a shocking, mysterious revelation. Ian Martin has done a skillful job of adapting the story into a play by adding just enough plot elements and foreshadowing to increase the dramatic conflict, as well as the suspense. In doing so, he successfully sustains the story for 40-odd minutes and, despite major plot additions, makes the play feel the same as the original short story. There is only one really important thing omitted from Martin's adaptation. In the original, De Maupassant cleverly gives us the option of a rational explanation for the murder. This, I think, is a master stroke. By casting doubt into the reader's mind at the end, he leaves us feeling, somehow, even more unsettled. Too bad it was left out of the radio play. Read the story and see what you think.

Thanks for providing a link to the original story---that's a great idea! I agree about RMT's adaptations. In fact---not to get off the subject---but I would even go so far as to say that they were more than occasionally excellent, especially in the case of the many Guy de Maupassant stories they adapted. Their version of "Diary of a Madman" was horribly spine-chilling, suspenseful and, at the very end, extremely satisfying as well. They took the one or two page original by de Maupassant, which is chillingly effective but very simple, and expanded it into something really amazing. (Can't recall who did the adaptation on that one.) I think the RMT version of Poe's "Tell-Tale Heart" also expands upon the original quite effectively, not to mention that it provides Robert Dryden with perhaps his most wonderfully disgusting lecherous-old-man role. (Then there's Fred Gwynne who, as usual, is just incomparable.) But, back to "The Hand"----I'm very curious to find out where in the story Martin foreshadows an explanation to the crime. I've actually heard the episode twice pretty recently, but I just can't remember where it would be. Could you possibly send a private message to clue me in? (I wouldn't want to spoil it for those who haven't listened yet.) Thanks!

But, back to "The Hand"----I'm very curious to find out where in the story Martin foreshadows an explanation to the crime. "GOT him - right under the englishman's nose!"

I liked this one. It had me worried that the wife was imprisoned against her will and the husband was going to kill the cop if he found out that he had that letter. Then he ended up finding out when "the hand" showed up in the mail. What a description they gave of that hand. Eeeeuuuuwwww! I was wondering how it fled the scene and then to hear the cop found it on the dead man's grave, I figured it was going to go on a killing spree or something. Of course, by that time the hour was up and we're left guessing as to what became of the hand. Maybe it turned over a new leaf and went straight.

Ok, I finally listened to the program for this week and I have to say I thoroughly enjoyed it. Though I've never read the original story, I think Ian Martin did a great job of painting a terrific picture for the imagination. The description of the hand was excellent and other details (such as the description of the trophy room) were so vivid they were made believable. I'll bet a few people think story was hokie but I imagine I would have been terrorized had I heard this play as a kid. As an adult, I could appreciate the fine production so I rated this program as a 5/5, though I rounded up from a 9/10. Great pick!

Great to see you posted a link to the original story. I'll be reading it directly. I agree with the comments regarding the music as it was chilling in it's effectiveness. Again, this show would have scared the crap out of me as a kid and this is one measure I use to judge a program.

What a great story! I did not get to it until the end of this week. It was worth the wait. Thanks! Pardon the pun in the subject line. I couldn't resist.

If anyone complains about the pun it's because they didn't think of it!

this episode has just made it to my top 5 list. i really enjoyed this one. i read the origonal story but i must say i like the rmt show better. i usually like to read a story more than listen to or watch an adaptation. i like the part about the wife. not knowing if she was being held as a prisoner. who do you believe? the man or the wife? the discription of the hand , very gripping.

I listened to and rated this one some time ago. I called it a "Kafkaesque tale of lost love and redemption." While the main character is not as tragic as Kafka's hero in "Metamorphisis", he is similar. This is perhaps the best work I've heard by Elspeth Eric. My opinion of her does not need to be aired again. Suffice it to say I always listen to her work waiting to be disappointed -- or occasionally disgusted. I truly enjoyed this one and was pleasantly surprised.

To date my all time favorite for CBSRMT and OTR in general. A feast of auditory delight.

It was 30 years ago today... the RMT did a whale of a play... HBD (#30) to "The hand".

Yet another good episode. I was, as others already noted, creeped out by the hand description. And I did wonder about the wife and why she was kept locked up--was she really crazy? My two questions that aren't answered are: 1. What was the past story? What did the brother do and why would the wife want to contact him? 2. Is there some reason why the hand didn't die? Is this there something unearthly or evil that the main character did to deserve this revenge? I will just have to imagine an answer for myself!

I really enjoyed this episode. It had interesting characters and an eerie, intriguing plot. The acting and production values were top-notch. Also, I noticed that the music was especially good. There seemed to be some new music written for this one, in addition to the usual incidental themes, which really enhanced the dark sense of foreboding. It is also an excellent dramatization. Guy de Maupassant's original story is engaging, but extremely short---barely 8 pages long. Presented as a brief unsettling anecdote, the tale is told by the magistrate to a group of ladies at a party in Paris. In the original story there is no insane wife and no betrayal by the magistrate with regard to sending the letter to America---in fact, his friendship with Sir Rowell is not nearly as close. Their acquaintance is only casual. Also, the hand is already there chained to the wall. The next thing our narrator hears, Rowell is dead, and he must go to investigate the grisly murder. The original story is effective because it is so short, giving very little foreshadowing, so the final outcome with the hand is a shocking, mysterious revelation. Ian Martin has done a skillful job of adapting the story into a play by adding just enough plot elements and foreshadowing to increase the dramatic conflict, as well as the suspense. In doing so, he successfully sustains the story for 40-odd minutes and, despite major plot additions, makes the play feel the same as the original short story. There is only one really important thing omitted from Martin's adaptation. In the original, De Maupassant cleverly gives us the option of a rational explanation for the murder. This, I think, is a master stroke. By casting doubt into the reader's mind at the end, he leaves us feeling, somehow, even more unsettled. Too bad it was left out of the radio play.

(Like "Captain of the Polestar" (adaptation) and "Time and again" or "The Vampire Plant" (original), this IMO is what mystery radio should be. And while the original version I've read of this tale didn't have the "wife" aspect, the CBSRMT scriptwriter did a fine job of incorporating it into the play. This is based upon a short story by the French writer Guy de Maupassant.) Monsieur Donet, a police magistrate on the French island of Corsica has a mysterious new neighbor. The man constantly is involved in target practice and hunting. He's a rich englishman, Sir John Rowell, and he's relocated to the island for a private retreat. He guards his privacy ferociously...immigration records the police magistrate has seen say Sir John has a wife there too, but no one has seen her. Then, Msr. Donet decides to make friends with Sir John. He visits the man at his mansion and is invited in for a glass of ale and english cheeses. While Sir John is a gracious host, the magistrate is somewhat unnerved by the vast collection of mounted animal heads on his wall, and is even more perplexed by what Sir John says is a spot for his greatest trophy - it's a large, velvet lined picture frame. Sir John hints that THAT trophy would be reserved for a man, the most dangerous creature, and that he may never fill it. Shortly thereafter, Sir John is alerted by his servant that his dogs (which have been trained to kill on his command) have cornered someone. While he hurries to see what's happened, the magistrate twists his ankle in pursuit and has to stay by the house. At that moment, a mysterious, shaken woman appears at the doorway and begs Msr. Donet to mail a letter for her. The magistrate pockets the letter and she disappears...when Sir John returns the magistrate notices the englishman wears "an American style gun belt" with two matched pistols and that his hand is right above the right gun. The disturbance is quickly forgotten, the two men become friends, but the magistrate finally mails the letter, which he notices has a U.S. address. Months later, Msr. Donet pays a friendly visit to Sir John bearing a mail package. Sir John is convinced he knows what it is and confronts the magistrate, who apologetically says that he was just trying to help. Even though Sir John seems to understand the magistrate meant no harm he says the magistrate may have signed the englishman's death warrant. Sir John asks Msr. Donet to watch as he unwraps the package. It contains a huge, dessicated but not skeletal hand. Later, Sir John asks Msr. Donet to be a witness to his will and testament. The latter man is stunned to see the hand in the "frame" trophy case, but instead of being mounted, it is "imprisoned" with a huge chain bolted into a link that would hold "an elephant"... (This one is a little more cerebral than "Polestar" but worth a listen if you've not heard it yet....)

In fact, here's the original story by de Maupassant. I was thinking this might be a fun one to ask: "Which is more fun to hear...the adaptation or the original?" I don't want to put down the latter, but I do think the RMT had some occasionally good adaptations. One thing about Martin's version...in retrospect, he gives us a big clue at the beginning to how all this could have happened. I, too, loved the music. This was one of the scariest RMTs I can remember from my original listening days, and hearing it again, it's that "do-re-mi-fa-so-la-so-fa" in minor chords (done in three separate versions...one a simple one with (I think) some kind of mallet instrument and a harp(?) right after Alexander Scourby's character says he'll have to satisfy his curiosity about Sir John Rowell, one using violins when Sir John is bringing his "gift from America" in to unwrap it, and the full instrumentation one with low piano notes at the beginning, played both when Sir John is facing off with Scourby like a gunslinger, and also when Sir John's prediction has come true). Call me a wimp, but that music gave me chills in my younger days. This was one of both Scourby's and Guy "Sir John" Sorrells best roles on the RMT, IMHO.

While at my daughter's doctor's appointment the other day I came upon a National Geographic magazine that did a fine story on the French island of Corsica, where this story was based. It gave a lot of information on the "vendettas" de Maupassant and E.G. Marshall talked about in this episode. It also made me want to visit there...beautiful looking place out in the Mediterranean. MAN, this was an excellent RMT episode.

Fun little pre-show fact...this episode is based upon Guy de Maupessant's short story, but writer Ian Martin apparently borrowed two key element

An avid hunter, his man-servant (havent you always wanted a man-servant!!??), and his wife, whom no one has ever seen, move next door to a local policeman. The policeman hears shots from next door quite frequently and indulges his curiosity by paying him a visit. There he discovers the gentleman has animal trophies all over his wall and a special place reserved for the most dangerous prey, man. When the hunter is called away, the policeman is approached by the wife who is frantic and pleads with him to post a letter she gives to him. Shortly after, a hand appears in the hunter's mail and he promptly mounts it in his special spot. While it is adapted from the deMaupassant story, there is a theme borrowed from a short story, by Richard Connell.

Two last things: - I'd read that de Maupassant was apparently inspired to write The hand (or whatever the original title was) when one of his professors showed him a box containing a desiccated hand. What's the old saying: "With friends like these..."? - it's interesting to note where the inspiration for some of these plays and adaptations came from as well. Others have noted that these stories more often than not are apparently inspired by more than one tale. I listened to The Hand a few times and kept thinking I'd heard something before. (Cue the RMT music.) Sir John Rowell, in the original story, and Richard Rowell added in Ian Martin's adaptation. Two english brothers, one of nobility yet also with unanswered, possibly sinister motives. The other de-knighted yet physically stronger, in a different country a long way away, hopefully (in his brother's view) forgotten yet apparently very much a rival...with Sir John wanting to keep his bounty and never see his brother again. Richard and John, John and Richard... Then it hit me...for this play, Martin mixed de Maupassant's The Hand with elements from Robin Hood. (Remember King Richard the Lion-hearted and Prince John in that tale, which itself was apparently cobbled together?) I LOVE the RMT!

Two last things: - Storytellermommy, I'd read that de Maupassant was apparently inspired to write The hand (or whatever the original title was) when one of his professors showed him a box containing a desiccated hand. What's the old saying: "With friends like these..."? - Steve, it's interesting to note where the inspiration for some of these plays and adaptations came from as well. Others have noted that these stories more often than not are apparently inspired by more than one tale. I listened to The Hand a few times and kept thinking I'd heard something before. (Cue the RMT music.) Sir John Rowell, in the original story, and Richard Rowell added in Ian Martin's adaptation. Two english brothers, one of nobility yet also with unanswered, possibly sinister motives. The other de-knighted yet physically stronger, in a different country a long way away, hopefully (in his brother's view) forgotten yet apparently very much a rival...with Sir John wanting to keep his bounty and never see his brother again. Richard and John, John and Richard... Then it hit me...for this play, Martin mixed de Maupassant's The Hand with elements from Robin Hood. (Remember King Richard the Lion-hearted and Prince John in that tale, which itself was apparently cobbled together?) I LOVE the RMT!

I've read Guy De Maupassant's short story before and I think Ian Martin did a terrific adaptation to this. His choice of words of writing about the Hand in ACT 2 were creepily descriptive as if you were actually staring at it with Henri Donnet (played by Alexander Scourby) & Sir John Rowell (played by Guy Sorel). Listen to Alexander Scourby's voice at the 26-minute mark when he says the word "black and desiccated", it sounds like he overstated it, but entertaining. The music in ACT 2 and ACT 3 was bone-chilling & wickedly sinister. And what an ending!

The MUSIC that plays the first time (after Sir John's target practice), then while Scourby is talking describing the hand (as you said above) and throughout the episode is, I believe, excerpted from the Twilight Zone (original) episode "Mr. Denton on Doomsday". Every TWZ music cue had a name, and this one was called "Fear". Amazingly, they only played a few notes from it and only used it once, apparently, in the whole Rod Serling TWZ Series.

Great episode. I like how they didn't spell things out for you, and how the backstory and ending has some blanks that the listener can fill in for themselves--still somewhat mysterious.

\"The Hand\" was a well written adaptation with excellent acting and character development; something difficult to do in just 47 minutes. The ending climax is subtle so pay close attention. 4 stars.

I rate this as 4 out of 5 for great. I enjoyed it very much the acting was excellent! The story left me wanting more! I understand they basically figured it all out but still...

EXCELLENT. Guy De Maupassant + CBSRMT = A terrific episode, HANDS down! Let's give Ian Martin a HAND for writing a great adaptation. With it's odious music & stirring dialogue, can any of you fans HANDle it?

As a youngster, I remember this episode scaring me out of my absolute mind. My father used to hasten the effect when he tapped his fingers on the wall between his bedroom and mine, as if the bloody hand was busily crawling around our house searching for its next victim. “The Hand” is a fantastic adaptation by Ian Martin of Guy de Maupassant’s short story. Ian Martin also stars in a supporting role. Main character and narrator is Alexander Scourby’s masculine yet warm voice is reminiscent of film actor Liam Neeson’s hypnotic timbre. With a combination of charismatic protagonism and courteous deference, Scourby plays the role of polite yet nosy investigator superbly. Even more wonderful is the dueling wordplay between Scourby and Guy Sorel, who plays Sir John Rowell, a man’s man and charming transplant to the town but with a dark and morbid secret. What is Rowell hiding? Listening to Sorel (Rowell) excellently deliver Martin’s radio play, you find yourself wishing that people still spoke this way – with a focus on content AND delivery. In a particularly memorable piece of writing, Rowell describes his distant brother and fierce rival as “a man whose wild and dark handsomeness could stir women to a passion beyond their senses.” Great stuff, Ian! With a memorable musical score to boot, I give The Hand 5 stars out of 5. – JUROR #4

"The Hand" features some of the best writing in the series. I was grabbed from the first line and absorbed by the story throughout. The voice acting is top notch and the dialogue well crafted. There is no padding; the tale is lean and delivers a great end to Act II and a double climax in Act 3. The writer does a good job of striking a balance between providing answers and leaving questions hanging. Which brother was actually evil? What exactly happened to the wife? Why was the brother referred to as a thief? I rank this in my top 5; it never gets old. I try to listen to "The Hand" at least once a year.

Another excellent adapted from the story by Guy de Maupassant. I really need to read his stories and compare, but I know I'll hear the voices from these adaptations. At the end I was thinking of the movie "The Hand" with Michael Caine, but with major differences (if you've seen the movie).

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