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CBSRMT Episode Information
Title:
Hand in Glove
Plot:
When a young surgeon begins having trouble controlling his hands, he is sickened by the realization that the transplant not only gave him back the use of his extremities, but it also gave the serial killer to whom they previously belonged another chance to resume his sinister deeds.
Episode:
1116
Air Dates:
First Run - September 8, 1980
Repeat - December 10, 1980
Writer:
Listen:
Rating:
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22 Responses to Episode 1116


It is not necessary for me to give too much information as I don't want to ruin the listening experience for you but let me say that you should not assume that the program is so similar that there are no surprises, and the ending - well, you will have to listen. A killer has committed five murders inside a hospital in recent weeks and security is heightened. A plan has been devised to catch the murderer. But, it is what will happen after the killer is caught that will create the suspense in this episode.

Does a show have to be scary to be enjoyable? I think not! Sometimes a good comedy or farce can be very enjoyable too. That probably was not the intention of the writer of this show, but you may find yourself chuckling anyway! Enjoy!

I really enjoyed this one. Many times it was just too easy to predict what was going to happen. This didn't take away the entertainment value, though. But when Laurel and Jedd were going to the supply area...well, you probably knew what was going to happen, too. And the drama music that sounded when Laurel and Dan were going to go to the ship's diner to celebrate...gosh, you just knew a disaster was looming! The one big surprise for me was the ending. It was the opposite from what I expected. On another note, it seemed that poor Dr. Dan Crane had too many advisors. I tried thinking about what each one represented. Here is my take (I'm probably spelling everyone's names incorrectly...): Nurse Laurel Blair: The devoted believer...the kind of person we all need in our lives. Ziorna: The supernateral...things are not as they seem. Dr. Stewart Courtney: Told from his voice, a realist and unafraid to speak his opinion. Dr. Wexler: Insights to subconscious, ally for Dr. Coutney and Laurel. Jedd Gantt: The dark force that tempts us. Himself: Conflicted, desparate, ready to try extremes, sometimes his own worst enemy. My favorite part about this story is that we are left to our own opinion regarding the reason for the evil actions that Dr. Crane demonstrated after the microsurgery: Was it due to his subconscious, as Dr. W asserted, or was it due to Jedd's curse, as Ziona asserted and we are possibly led to believe during much of the story?

I was very eager to hear this one because it was from a writer whose work I am unfarmiliar with. Well, after listening I have more respect for Sam Dann than ever before. It was not the worst episode of cbsrmt by a longshot, but it made me realize that radio could be smelled as well as heard. And just how does a possessed hand interfere with your driving? Doesn't it require your whole arm to stear a car? But damn that rotten Jed. I just hope he burns in hell!

The first thing that struck me was the thought of even transferring "the hand" from that murderer to the doctor. even the thought of that was incredulous to me. but hey these shows all have their weirdness and strangeness at times, so i took it all in stride. i could not even predict the ending. just had to wait and see. anyways....

There were a number of things in this episode, like the transfer of the hand, that I found unbelievable and even ridiculous, too. I also thought this episode was pretty predictable, but at the same time it was sheer joy to listen to. Probably (certainly) not one of the truly great episodes, but one worth of a listen, even if just for a little chuckle.

Doesn't it require your whole arm to stear a car?," I'm not sure, but I'm guessing that the explanation that it was not possessed but rather a self-fulfilling prophecy (as in, steered by his subconscious) would be a tad more reasonable...would you agree?

Quote: Confusacat, regarding "And just how does a possessed hand interfere with your driving? Doesn't it require your whole arm to stear a car?," I'm not sure, but I'm guessing that the explanation that it was not possessed but rather a self-fulfilling prophecy (as in, steered by his subconscious) would be a tad more reasonable...would you agree? I think only Jed could answer that one for sure.

Quote: Regarding "And just how does a possessed hand interfere with your driving? Doesn't it require your whole arm to stear a car?," I'm not sure, but I'm guessing that the explanation that it was not possessed but rather a self-fulfilling prophecy (as in, steered by his subconscious) would be a tad more reasonable...would you agree? I think only Jed could answer that one for sure.

Quote: Wasn't there another RMT that had to do with a man who somehow ended up with a different person's hand and committed crimes. A pianist? I may be totally wrong. This one: 740326 Death By Whose Hands Ha ha! I recognized Dick McDaniels voice after about three words. KOA baby! I heard most of the RMTs originally on KOA Denver or KFAB Omaha. Show was entertaining. The alarm was a bit cheesy. Sounded like one of those clown blow-whistles.

This episode was one of many RMT shows that left open two possible explanations for the events, one supernatural, the other rational and non-supernatural. Normally, I opt for the supernatural angle, but in this case, I think it was his subconscious. That line of reasoning better explains the car incident since his subconscious would control more than just his hand. And it would also explain why he still acted strangely on water, contrary to what the mystic had asserted. The bottom line is that the show entertained me and I wish there was a modern version of RMT because it was different from TV. Wasn't there another RMT that had to do with a man who somehow ended up with a different person's hand and committed crimes. A pianist? I may be totally wrong.

Quote: The bottom line is that the show entertained me and I wish there was a modern version of RMT because it was different from TV. I agree that if the show entertains then the goal has been achieved. Even the absurd can be entertaining at times. I believe it was that great philosopher Willy Wonka that said' "A little nonsense, now and then, is relished by the wisest men." Quote: Wasn't there another RMT that had to do with a man who somehow ended up with a different person's hand and committed crimes. A pianist? I may be totally wrong. I haven't listened to these in a while but it could be one of these...

This is CBSRMT at its most comic-bookish; illogical, garish, deliriously over-the-top, and pure pleasure to listen to. Hey, you gotta hand it to 'em! The fact that logic doesn't play much role here is illustrated by the way in which our hero gets his new hand. Did it cross anyone's mind that hacking off a dead guy's hand and sewing it onto somebody else might be the teensiest bit illegal? No matter. The psychobabble in the third act, designed to provide a "logical" ending, is similarly, well...suspect. "Hand in Glove" is a great reminder that Himan Brown's best-known OTR credit from earlier days was INNER SANCTUM, a show which ran endless stories like this. I loved the way that the spirit medium showed up for no real reason whatever (the character could have simply decided to take a cruise to try to relax and forget his troubles!). And the little siren-alarms that the people carried around sounded, I swear, exactly like New Year's Eve party favors. It truly doesn't get any better than that. Creepy-hand stories have a long tradition, going back at least to Maupassant's famed tale "The Hand" and moving right through Hollywood's Golden Age, with movies like THE BEAST WITH FIVE FINGERS. "Hand in Glove" doesn't really add anything to the tradition, but it provided some of the best fun I've had with the RMT in quite awhile. I say let's give 'em a hand! A GREAT BIG hand!

Real theatrical drama - the music and the people true over the top acting and mellow dramic great stuff. Poor Dan sounds like he needs a good pick me up...such a weak and feeble voice. I think the oscar for this episode goes the the women (Dracula's Sister) with the crystal ball..she was fantastic what a great voice and dont you just love those spells.....the whole show in mho went on a roller coaster speed one minutre fast next slowing down and the end was like a wet weekend in Washington! Entertainment value for giggles 4 out of 5 - Keeping in the tradition of RMT to scare your socks off 1 out of 5. Well thats my 5 cents worth

that voice! i can't help but wonder if the killer's voice was done by mandel kramer and the fortune teller's voice wasn't done by Diana Kirkwood... it's happened before where one actor will provide two voices. hmmm.... but yes, this was definitely a roller coaster ride. 

It was, all in all, a fun episode- call it a Twilight Zone reject plot. It is of course part of a long tradition of reattached hand stories, such as the Hands of Orlac- this one is a bit different in that the protagonist definitely knows he is getting a killer's hand, and the killer knows he is giving it to them. The psychobabble element tries to keep the story in the realm of reality rather than the supernatural, but I'm not sure that helps. Reminds me of the fun times I had listening to RMT as a kid- I don't recall hearing it when it first aired but I'm sure I would have been thrilled with it then.

Do they transplant spleens? I thought they just took them out and left you without one?

when i first heard this one, i wasn't sure whether to giggle or to roll my eyes. the performances were great and the production was, as usual, top notch. chris, i couldn't agree more with your views! for me, one of my favorite elements was the killer's voice that "possessed" the lead character. it wasn't a very scary voice, but rather sort of humorous. i kept thinking, "is that Ed Asner?" once the show got going, i was quickly reminded of the intensely creepy 1935 Peter Lorre film, Mad Love. While i assume this episode was intended to be very serious and maybe even scary, it truly did come off with a light air about it and a campish sense of humor that, i think, most of us here can appreciate. a good show with a lot of things to love going on within.

I LOOOOOVE the mysterious, dreamlike music bed under the intro sample to the episode. I've always wondered...sometimes during this time E.G. would say: "Our mystery drama, (the title)". In this (and other) cases, he'd say: "Our suspense drama, (the title)". Wonder what the difference was. Interesting story on this one. The bad guy at the beginning played by Russel Horton was amusing.

It was an enjoyable story, but I just listened to "Death by whose hands" last week. It was a very similar story line so I was not as in awe of the story. My loss! It is interesting though how the same theme comes up again and again--hands from one person on someone else hold the essence of the other person.

Quote: It is interesting though how the same theme comes up again and again--hands from one person on someone else hold the essence of the other person. i'm still waiting for the perfect episode about a spleen transfer... an EVIL spleen transfer, of course! hehe!

Em "Evil Spleen Transfer" sending out evil white blood cells to cause infection rather than fight infection.....Filtering the blood and ADDING unwanted and efective red cells.....Yup I think you certainly need ot go back on the medication

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