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CBSRMT Episode Information
Title:
Conspiracy
Plot:
A classic narration of the secret plot to assassinate Abraham Lincoln and his cabinet by conspirators John Wilkes Booth and his pack of ragtag followers.
Episode:
1071
Air Dates:
First Run - March 26, 1980
Repeat - July 10, 1980
Listen:
Rating:
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6 Responses to Episode 1071


Episode 1071, "Conspiracy" is similar in title to 0918, "The Conspiracy", however they are both uniquely different stories.

Very well done story on the Lincoln Assassination.

This is a terrific episode. Everyone is on the money this time, and there's very sharp writing throughout. I wish all of the shows were up to this standard. Even the sound seems clearer than ever. Kevin McCarthy and Arnold Moss are superior, but Russell Horton and Court Benson are right there keeping step. There's no suspense, because we know the ending, but it paints a chilling portrait of the components of a bargain basement conspiracy that worked because of the period it took place in. Poor Abe was so easy to get to. What a listening experience! I've recommended this one to several people.

I applaud G. Frederick Lewis for writing the dramatization of a historical assassination coming from the assassin’s point of view. Not often do we get to hear historical moments coming from the infamous’ perspectives on OTR (Old Time Radio) series. But G. Frederick Lewis certainly did his homework on knowing who John Wilkes Booth was; making references to Thomas Otway’s play of VENICE PRESERV’D, the Conspirators who murdered Julius Caesar, Booth’s gang of Conspirators named Samuel Mudd, George Atzerodt, Lewis Payne a.k.a. Lewis Powell, and John Harrison Surratt, Jr. Plus, the details of the kidnapping strategy for March 16th, 1865, the assassination plan for April 14th, 1985 at Ford’s Theatre, and the infamous words that Booth said when he shot Lincoln to avenge the South, “Sic semper tyrannis!” Which means, “Ever thus to tyrants!” The sounds of the applause, clinking of the drinks, birds chirping, horses galloping with the carriage, the bell tolls at midnight, door bell ringing, wind blowing at night, the bell tolls at 9, the rooster call, bell tolls again at 8, theatre actors performing in the background, and the gun shot were right on the mark. And so was the music. There were patriotic tunes and sinister track themes in every act. The peaceful night theme at the 25-minute mark and Lincoln’s lonely theme at the 30-minute mark were my favorites. E.G. Marshall was on point with his narrations. In his Prologue, he begins talking about unforgettable events in history. In ACT-1, the story begins with John Wilkes Booth performing with his brothers, Junius & Edwin Booth, in New York City on November 25th, 1864. Later, it’s revealed that the gang of Conspirators wanted to do this for the money, except Booth himself. In ACT-2 , the plot to kidnap Lincoln is set. In ACT-3, E.G. Marshall brings us to speed on how Lincoln felt in a time of war. In the end, he mentions that Booth believed that he was Marcus Brutus of the 19th Century for killing a leader to save Liberty. In the Epilogue, he informs us that everything in this story was true and nothing was changed. We can never understand a villain’s actions unless we walk a mile in their shoes and see how they are the heroes in their dark world. As for the actors in this Drama-Mystery, they were at their finest. Kevin McCarthy (as John Wilkes Booth), Russell Horton (as Lewis Payne & Abraham Lincoln), Arnold Moss (as Dr. Samuel Mudd), and Court Benson (as John Harrison Surratt, Jr. & Edwin Stanton). If you love Kevin McCarthy’s acting when he played Sherlock Holmes 10 times for CBSRMT, you will love his talented acting for playing John Wilkes Booth: Actor & Assassin. If you’re a History Buff, this is an episode that I highly recommend. Until next time…pleasant dreams.

I thoroughly enjoyed it!

I rate this episode ★★★★★ for EXCELLENT. I applaud G. Frederick Lewis for writing the dramatization of a historical assassination coming from the assassin’s point of view. Not often do we get to hear historical moments coming from the infamous’ perspectives on OTR (Old Time Radio) series. But G. Frederick Lewis certainly did his homework on knowing who John Wilkes Booth was; making references to Thomas Otway’s play of VENICE PRESERV’D, the Conspirators who murdered Julius Caesar, Booth’s gang of Conspirators named Samuel Mudd, George Atzerodt, Lewis Payne a.k.a. Lewis Powell, and John Harrison Surratt, Jr. Plus, the details of the kidnapping strategy for March 16th, 1865, the assassination plan for April 14th, 1985 at Ford’s Theatre, and the infamous words that Booth said when he shot Lincoln to avenge the South, “Sic semper tyrannis!” Which means, “Ever thus to tyrants!” The sounds of the applause, clinking of the drinks, birds chirping, horses galloping with the carriage, the bell tolls at midnight, door bell ringing, wind blowing at night, the bell tolls at 9, the rooster call, bell tolls again at 8, theatre actors performing in the background, and the gun shot were right on the mark. And so was the music. There were patriotic tunes and sinister track themes in every act. The peaceful night theme at the 25-minute mark and Lincoln’s lonely theme at the 30-minute mark were my favorites. E.G. Marshall was on point with his narrations. In his Prologue, he begins talking about unforgettable events in history. In ACT-1, the story begins with John Wilkes Booth performing with his brothers, Junius & Edwin Booth, in New York City on November 25th, 1864. Later, it’s revealed that the gang of Conspirators wanted to do this for the money, except Booth himself. In ACT-2 , the plot to kidnap Lincoln is set. In ACT-3, E.G. Marshall brings us to speed on how Lincoln felt in a time of war. In the end, he mentions that Booth believed that he was Marcus Brutus of the 19th Century for killing a leader to save Liberty. In the Epilogue, he informs us that everything in this story was true and nothing was changed. We can never understand a villain’s actions unless we walk a mile in their shoes and see how they are the heroes in their dark world. As for the actors in this Drama-Mystery, they were at their finest. Kevin McCarthy (as John Wilkes Booth), Russell Horton (as Lewis Payne & Abraham Lincoln), Arnold Moss (as Dr. Samuel Mudd), and Court Benson (as John Harrison Surratt, Jr. & Edwin Stanton). If you love Kevin McCarthy’s acting when he played Sherlock Holmes 10 times for CBSRMT, you will love his talented acting for playing John Wilkes Booth: Actor & Assassin. If you’re a History Buff, this is an episode that I highly recommend. Until next time…pleasant dreams. =^D

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